Tuesday, 31 May 2016

Survival Bags

 
 
This Snugpack Response Pack contains the following items -
 
  • A small Gransford-Bruks Axe.
  • A Bahco folding saw.
  • A survival knife with steel-striker.
  • A small ground-sheet.
  • Paracord and tarp fasteners.
  • A basic fire-lighting kit.
  • A basha (strapped to the outside).
  • A small torch (fastened to outside).
  • A survival blanket.
This kit all fits into the pack easily, with the basha strapped to the outside. To complement this I sometimes use another 'bum-bag' which contains the following -
 
  • An mKettle.
  • A small water-bottle.
  • some 3-in-1 coffee sachets.
  • Dried meals.
  • A fork-spoon.
  • 2 plastic cups.
The two bags can be carried over the shoulders, crossing over each other, which is quite comfortable and not heavy.
 
 
 
 
The survival knife has a steel-striker and a sharpener attached to the sheaf, which makes it a very useful and handy tool to carry. This has seen many years of wear without any problems and keeps very sharp. It is Swedish made.
 
 


The above is a Japanese made mini-saw, but I usually carry a Barco folding saw which is larger and cuts larger logs. The Bahco has given years of use and as yet has not even had to have the blade renewed. I have also used these Bahco folding saws for many years on gardening tasks.

To be quite honest this small kit is quite sufficient for training purposes; the twin-bags are easy to carry and with each one containing different things - one contains shelter/fire, the other contains food/drink/cooking - it is easy to get to what you need.
 


 
This is the mKettle which heats up quickly when used with wood fuel, and slightly less quick when using a methylated-spirit burner (and slower with the latter in the cold of winter). It was new when this photo was taken some years ago, and today it is still going strong, though it does suffer from a typical fault (like the Kelly Kettle) of the aluminium base distorting slightly after a few years of heat using wood fuel. This, however, does not distract from its purpose and it still works fine.
 
 
 
 
This is the Storm-Kettle or Kelly-Kettle which is slightly larger and does not have the cover which makes it easy to lift up. Again, this one was new when the photo was taken, but after many years of use it is still going strong. I have a larger one for our Folk-Camps.
 
 
 
 
 
This is the mini-axe from Gransford-Bruks which fits perfectly into the small pack. It is now some years old and has kept its edge well through sharpening and keeping clean. Although very small it is heavy enough to tackle many of the jobs needed in survivalism. I have the larger hatchet too which is used at Folk-Camps.
 
This is not a 'survival kit' in the sense of a small kit carried at all times; it is a kit suited to weekly training in a local woodland area. The idea is to do the basic survival training as a weekly practice - 'practice makes perfect'. This then becomes automatic and the work can be done without thinking about it. The advantage is that once the basic shelter-building and fire-lighting can be done automatically the basics are done with and other important tasks can then be undertaken.

 
 



1 comment:

  1. I met the owners of the Ghillie Kettle company last week who make the mKettle. All of their products are made here in the UK which makes a pleasant change!

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